Lessons

  • Overview
  • Lesson 1: How to Shift to a Future That’s Built on Open [3:16]
  • Lesson 2: The 5 Principles of Being Open [3:28]
  • Lesson 3: Creating a Culture and Motivation for Open as a Leader [2:20]
  • Knowledge Check
  • Post-Course Survey

Please sign up for the course to view lesson content

Today’s world and today’s government require new skills—skills involving creative differentiation and innovation. Employees today crave authentic and honest interaction, access to transparent information, opportunities to weigh in on critical decisions, and meaningful work.

We need to start rebuilding our organizations on new values and principles—open values and principles. Embracing greater openness in all facets of our lives—such as culture (both organizational and societal), education, access to information, co-creation models, engineering, and computing—is critical. It’s the best way to build a balanced and free society that paves the way for future technological advances and new ways of working together to build our world.

But what exactly does “open” mean?

Open leadership isn’t something anyone can learn by reading a single book or skimming a checklist. It’s deeper than that—something that’s part of your organizational culture.

Becoming an open organization isn’t easy. Changing culture to make it more open is difficult because it involves trying to influence not only how people work but also what people value. Like any other facet of organizational culture, open leadership encompasses both.

In this course, we’ll be going over how you can set the foundations and principles for open leadership in your organization.

For more information, check out this resource:

A Government Leadership Guide to Cultural Change